Calendar

Mar
25
Mon
Monday Night Film: THE SILENT REVOLUTION @ Tilley Hall, UNB, Room 102
Mar 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

March 25, 2019 – 7:30pm at Tilley Hall, UNB Campus

THE SILENT REVOLUTION

Germany, 2018
German, Russian w/English subtitles
111 minutes
Principal cast: Tom Gramenz, Leonard Scheicher, Florian Lukas, Joans Dassler

In 1956 East Germany, a group of senior high schoolers demonstrate solidarity with recent victims of the Hungarian Revolution. Their brief, silent protest ignites underlying tensions and leads to grave consequences.

Lars Kraume (The People vs. Fritz Bauer) examines a fascinating moment in German history — just a few years before the construction of the Berlin Wall begins — with this film based on the true story of a high-school classroom that becomes the site of a political battle of wills. When Kurt (Tom Gramenz) and Theo (Leonard Scheicher) sneak into a West German cinema and catch the pre-feature newsreel, they see a very different depiction of the uprising in Budapest than what they’ve heard at home, in the East German town of Stalinstadt. The young men return home inspired at the thought of an idealistic revolution.

After debating with their classmates about the virtues of the Hungarian uprising, Kurt and Theo persuade a majority of their peers to join them in a two-minute observation of silence during class, in solidarity with those killed in the struggle. Their teacher is shocked and confused, and reports the incident to the principal, Direktor Schwarz (Florian Lukas, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Goodbye Lenin!). Despite trying to contain the situation, Schwarz can’t keep his bosses from hearing of the political protest. As the story spreads through the upper levels of the administration, the students slowly realize the growing gravity of their situation.

Deftly weaving together threads of political tension, adolescent rebellion, and institutional menace, Kraume asks us to consider the connection between a nation’s identity and its influence on the identities of its young people, who are just beginning to question their place in society.

[A] solid, good-looking piece of filmmaking which is elevated by a clutch of strong performances from the young cast.” Wendy Ide, Screen Daily

Mar
29
Fri
Cinema Politica: “Kokom” and “A Time to Swim” @ Conserver House, Fredericton
Mar 29 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Cinema Politica Fredericton returns this winter with films on scheduled Fridays at 7:00pm at Conserver House, 180 Saint John St., Fredericton.

Visit the our website. Like us on Facebook.

Contact: fredericton@cinemapolitica.org.

March 29

Kokom (short)

Kevin Papatie presents a beautiful experimental film, a tribute to his grandmother, his kokom, and, through it, to the Anishnabe people who have survived the trials of history and remained strong.

Trailer: http://www.wapikoni.ca/movies/kokom-2381bd

A Time to Swim

A Time to Swim” (A. Duong / Canada / 2016 / 82 min.) screens on Friday, Mar. 29th at 7:00pm at Conserver House, 180 Saint John St., Fredericton.

In the suburbs of Montreal, Mutang is a family man. But in Malaysia, he was a voice of resistance for the indigenous peoples of Sarawak. This film explores the effects of environmental destruction on the fabric of a community through the personal story of Mutang’s search for belonging in a place where the very ideas of home and heritage are slipping away. A short film by Anishnabe filmmaker Kevin Papatie will be shown before the feature length film.
This film is co-hosted by the Culture and Media Studies Media Artist in Residence. Film will be followed by an optional discussion with filmmaker Lisa Jodoin, current Media Artist in Residence. Jodoin’s residency is supported by ArtsNB.
All are welcome. Screenings are free but donations are welcome. Conserver House location is wheelchair accessible but the washrooms are up the stairs.

Trailer: https://www.nfb.ca/film/time_to_swim/

With: Lisa Jodoin, Indigenous Filmmaker in Residence

Co-host: UNB Culture & Media Studies

NB Media Co-op
180 St. John St.,
Fredericton, NB
E3B 4A9
Email: info@nbmediacoop.org
Web: www.nbmediacoop.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nbmediacoop
Twitter: https://twitter.com/nbmediacoop

Apr
1
Mon
Monday Night Film: THE FAVOURITE @ Tilley Hall, UNB, Room 102
Apr 1 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

April 1, 2019 – 7:30pm at Tilley Hall, UNB Campus

THE FAVOURITE

Ireland / UK / USA
English
119 mins
Principal cast: Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz, Emma Stone

In early 18th century England, a frail Queen Anne (Colman) occupies the throne and her close friend Lady Sarah (Weisz) governs the country in her stead. When a new servant Abigail (Stone) arrives, her charm endears her to Sarah.

In the early 18th century, England is at war with the French. Nevertheless, duck racing and pineapple eating are thriving. A frail Queen Anne occupies the throne, and her close friend Lady Sarah governs the country in her stead while tending to Anne’s ill health and mercurial temper. When a new servant, Abigail, arrives, her charm endears her to Sarah. Sarah takes Abigail under her wing, and Abigail sees a chance to return to her aristocratic roots.

The Favourite sees Yorgos Lanthimos balancing a period setting against rich, timely subtext – and getting roundly stellar performances from his well-chosen stars.

Early 18th century. England is at war with the French. Nevertheless, duck racing and pineapple eating are thriving. A frail Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) occupies the throne and her close friend Lady Sarah Churchill (Rachel Weisz) governs the country in her stead while tending to Anne’s ill health and mercurial temper. When a new servant Abigail Masham (Emma Stone) arrives, her charm endears her to Sarah. Sarah takes Abigail under her wing and Abigail sees a chance at a return to her aristocratic roots. As the politics of war become quite time consuming for Sarah, Abigail steps into the breach to fill in as the Queen’s companion. Their burgeoning friendship gives her a chance to fulfill her ambitions and she will not let woman, man, politics or rabbit stand in her way.

Period authenticity clashes happily with occasional creative anachronisms to present audiences with a portrait of power as sobering as it is scabrously conniving. Ann Hornaday Washington Post

Lanthimos’ renegade deviltry turns a period piece into a bawdy, brilliant triumph. Expect Oscar to bow down to Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz and the mighty Olivia Colman as Queen Anne for bringing a #MeToo punch to 18th-century British politics. Peter Travers, Rolling Stone

Apr
8
Mon
Monday Night Film: WOMAN AT WAR @ Tilley Hall, UNB, Room 102
Apr 8 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

April 8, 2019 – 7:30pm at Tilley Hall, UNB Campus

WOMAN AT WAR

ICELAND/FRANCE/UKRAINE, 2018
Icelandic w/ English subtitles
100 minutes
Principal Cast: Halldóra Geirharðsdóttir, Jóhann Sigurðarson, Juan Camilo Roman Estrada

As a follow-up to his 2013 film Of Horses and Men, director Benedikt Erlingsson delivers Iceland’s nominee submission for Best Foreign Language Film at the 91st Academy Awards: Woman at War, a timely film that speaks to social issues with wit and warmth. Halla (Halldóra Geirharðsdóttir in a bravura performance) is a choirmaster who loves her job. And, she’s just learned she’s been approved to adopt a child from a war-torn area in Ukraine, a longtime dream of hers.

The only hitch is that Halla is also a terrorist – an eco-terrorist to be exact. The proliferation of heavy industry, urged on by unscrupulous politicians, has been ruining Iceland’s rugged landscape and she’s taken action. Dubbed the Mountain Woman, Halla soon becomes the scourge of the aluminum industry. She is determined to see things through… but she can’t help wondering, would it be more fulfilling to save hypothetical future lives or one actual life: the daughter she has yet to meet and may never if she’s apprehended. Erlingsson’s second feature drills deep into the inevitable dilemmas plaguing almost everyone committed to the greater good. And the political satire here is precise and rich.

It’s evident in the sleazy Fox News–style way the government demonizes Halla. At the same time, there’s a puckish, postmodernist sense of humour percolating though the film that suggests vintage Makavejev and Godard, or even Alain Tanner’s classic Jonah Who will be 25 in the Year 2000.

A tiny jazz band follows Halla everywhere she goes — on rooftops, in remote fields, in the middle of a flood — sometimes joined by a cadre of singers in traditional Ukrainian dress. It’s a reminder that the revolution should be hopeful, not just gloom and doom. And it should come with cool music.

Is there anything rarer than an intelligent feel-good film that knows how to tackle urgent global issues with humor as well as a satisfying sense of justice? Look no further than Woman at War. Jay Weissberg, Variety

Apr
12
Fri
Cinema Politica: “What’s Up Doc? Shorts” and “Social Proof” @ Conserver House, Fredericton
Apr 12 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Cinema Politica Fredericton Winter 2019

Cinema Politica Fredericton returns this winter with films on scheduled Fridays at 7:00pm at Conserver House, 180 Saint John St., Fredericton.

Visit the our website. Like us on Facebook.

Contact: fredericton@cinemapolitica.org.

Winter 2019 Schedule

 

April 12

What’s Up Doc? Shorts 

Films by Fredericton high school students and curated by filmmaker/producer Matt Rogers.

“Social Proof”

A film about the Cyberviolence Project by the Muriel McQueen Centre for Family Violence Research.

NB Media Co-op
180 St. John St.,
Fredericton, NB
E3B 4A9
Email: info@nbmediacoop.org
Web: www.nbmediacoop.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nbmediacoop
Twitter: https://twitter.com/nbmediacoop

Apr
15
Mon
Monday Night Film: Wild Rose @ Tilley Hall, UNB, Room 102
Apr 15 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

April 15, 2019 – 7:30pm at Tilley Hall, UNB Campus

WILD ROSE

UK, 2018
English
101 minutes
Principal Cast: Jessie Buckley, Sophie Okonedo, Julie Walters

Rose-Lynn Harlan (TIFF 2017 Rising Star Jessie Buckley, Beast) has dreamt of becoming a country music star for as long as anyone can remember. But Glasgow isn’t exactly Nashville, and, as a convicted criminal and single mother of two young children, Rose-Lynn is more country song than country starlet.

Just released from prison, forced to wear an ankle monitor and keep curfew, she can’t return to her job as the house-band singer at Glasgow’s Grand Ole Opry. Sporting her white cowboy hat and white leather cowboy boots, Rose-Lynn lands a new job as a housekeeper for the lovely, and very posh, Susannah (Sophie Okonedo, television’s Chimerica, Hotel Rwanda). After catching her singing on the job, Susannah’s kids quickly become Rose-Lynn’s biggest fans and Susannah her enthusiastic patron, determined to help her get to Nashville. But Rose-Lynn’s dreams come at a cost. Her mother (Julie Walters, Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, Brooklyn), who knows all about abandoning dreams, has always done what she can to help her daughter realize hers, but she also wants her to take responsibility and act like the grown-up that her kids need her to be.

Buckley delivers a vivacious and unforgettable performance as Rose-Lynn, her voice a star of its own. With a confident hand, director Tom Harper brings Nicole Taylor’s beautiful, textured script, full of authentic characters and unexpected turns, to life in Glasgow, a city that, like his protagonist, might appear gritty on the surface, but is bursting with spirit and personality.

Rose-Lynn’s story reminds us that taking responsibility doesn’t have to mean giving up hope. And sometimes when we’re chasing our dreams, we realize we were living them all along.

A happy-sad drama of starstruck fever that lifts you up and sweeps you along, touching you down in a puddle of well-earned tears. Owen Gleiberman, Variety