Calendar

Sep
26
Tue
Great Trees of New Brunswick – 5 Days for the Forest @ University of New Brunswick's Faculty of Forestry & Environmental Management Building, Room 203
Sep 26 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

5 Days for the Forest is back this year to celebrate our forest in its fall glory with nature walks, art, music, film and TREEvia. Hosted by the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, 5 Days for the Forest events will occur in Fredericton during National Forest Week, Sept. 25-29, 2017. Thanks to our sponsors: OMISTA Credit Union, Crowne Plaza Fredericton Lord Beaverbrook, Milda’s Pizzas & More and Cinema Politica Fredericton. For more information, contact Tracy at tracy.glynn@conservationcouncil.ca.

Tuesday, Sept. 26: Great Trees of New Brunswick. University of New Brunswick’s Faculty of Forestry & Environmental Management Building, Room 203 at 5:30pm.

Geoff Ritchie, arborist and author of Trees of Knowledge, David Palmer, forester and Atlantic Forestry Review contributor, and Tracy Glynn with the Conservation Council will share stories about the hunt for New Brunswick’s great trees over Milda’s Pizza.

Sep
27
Wed
STU Conference in response to Truth and Reconciliation @ Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall – St. Thomas University
Sep 27 @ 1:00 pm – Sep 29 @ 12:00 pm

For more information visit http://w3.stu.ca/stu/news/160337

From: Dr. Kim Fenwick <vpacademic@stu.ca>
Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 5:21 PM
To: [FACULTY-L]
Subject: STU Conference in response to Truth and Reconciliation

Good afternoon,

On behalf of the Senate Committee on Indigenization of the Academy, I am pleased to announce that we will be hosting a conference as part of a series of events to address how St. Thomas University can participate in meeting the demands of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

Dates: September 27-29th

Location: Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall – St. Thomas University 

We have booked three excellent keynote speakers: Dr. Marie Battiste, Mr. Eddy Robinson, and Ms. Rebecca Thomas.

In addition, we have planned a celebration of Indigenous culture as part of the conference, which will include traditional teachings, songs, drumming, poetry, art, dance, music, and food.

We are hoping for a strong turn-out of faculty and students, and invite you to consider bringing your classes to one or more of the sessions. There will be no cost for registration.

A schedule is below this message; additional details will be posted on the STU website soon.

best wishes,

Dr. Kim Fenwick, Vice-President (Academic and Research), St. Thomas University
Fredericton NB
506-452-0531

A Conference Towards Reconciliation

Tetpawtihkene [Wolastoqey – “Let’s realign our path towards a shared vision”]
Ilsu’teka’tiqw [Mi’kmaq – “Re-aligning our path and coming together toward a new direction”] A New Path, A Shared Vision, A New Direction

September 27-29th
Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall – St. Thomas University

The conference is part of a series of events to address how St. Thomas University can participate in meeting the demands of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

Wednesday, September 27th 1 pm – 4:30 pm

A new path for communities: Working together and becoming allies

 Opening Prayer and Greeting Recognizing Traditional Territory
 Welcome
 Keynote – Eddy Robinson, “Working Together and Becoming Allies”

Eddy Robinson has dedicated his life to helping institutions develop an appreciation of Indigenous people. He approaches becoming an Indigenous ally through grounding learners with his personal insight to the Indigenous narrative in Canada and culturally safe methodologies of inclusivity and Indigenous ways of knowing to help form and foster better relationships with Indigenous people and communities.

  •   Panel Discussion
  •   Breakout Sessions
  •   Wrap-upThursday, September 28th 9 am – 12 Noon

    A shared vision for students: The two-eyed seeing approach

     Opening Prayer and Greeting Recognizing Traditional Territory
     Keynote – Rebecca Thomas, “Etuaptmumk: The Two-Eyed Seeing Approach”

    Etuaptmumk is the Mi’kmaw word for two-eyed seeing which refers to learning to see from one eye with the strengths of Indigenous knowledges and ways of knowing, and from the other eye with the strengths of Western knowledges and ways of knowing, and then learning to use both eyes together for the benefit of all. Spoken-word artist and Halifax Poet Laureate Rebecca Thomas is the Coordinator of Aboriginal Student Services at the Nova Scotia Community College.

  •   Panel Discussion
  •   Breakout Sessions
  •   Wrap-up1:00 pm – 4:30 pm (Lower Courtyard)
    Celebration of Indigenous Culture
     Traditional teachings, songs, drumming, poetry, art, dance, music, and food.

Friday, September 29th 9 am – 12 Noon

A new direction for curriculum: Incorporating Indigenous content

 Opening Prayer and Greeting Recognizing the Traditional Territory

 Keynote – Dr. Marie Battiste, “Incorporating Indigenous Content”

Dr. Battiste is a Mi’kmaw educator from the Potlotek First Nation, Nova Scotia and professor at the Department of Educational Foundations at the University of Saskatchewan. She is a nationally recognized expert on Aboriginal life-long learning, decolonizing and indigenizing the academy, and violence prevention and anti-bullying in schools.

  •   Panel Discussion
  •   Breakout Sessions
  •   Wrap-up
  •   Closing
  •   LunchFor further information, please contact Dr. Kim Fenwick at vpacademic@stu.ca.
Sep
29
Fri
The Human Right to a Healthy World lecture by Silver Donald Cameron @ Ted Daigle Auditorium - Edmund Casey Hall
Sep 29 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Public Lecture – “The Human Right to a Healthy World” by Silver Donald Cameron

DATE:   29/9/17
TIME:   2:30 PM
LOCATION:   Ted Daigle Auditorium – Edmund Casey Hall

Silver Donald Cameron will speak about “The Human Right to a Healthy World” on Friday, Sept.  29 at 2:30 pm in the Ted Daigle Auditorium in Edmund Casey Hall.

The lecture is co-hosted by the Environment and Society Program and the Atlantic Human Rights Centre.

Air, water, food—these are the sources of life. Without them, we die. In more than 180 nations, citizens are legally entitled to these essential elements of life. The GreenRights multi-media project (www.greenrights.com) examines dramatic, innovative legal battles all over the world and questions why this right to a healthy environment is not protected in Canada or the United States.

Dr. Cameron is the host and executive producer of  http://www.thegreeninterview.com/, an environmental website devoted to intense, in-depth conversations with the brilliant thinkers and activists who are leading the way to a green, sustainable future. He is also the author of the Green Rights book, Warrior Lawyers: From Manila to Manhattan, Attorneys for the Earth – fifteen interviews with trail-blazing lawyers from nine countries, plus a wide-ranging essay by the author.

“With the weather-related disasters of the summer of 2017—floods in central Canada, heat waves and fires in Western Canada, and recurring mega-storms in the southern US and Caribbean—we realize that it has never been more important that citizens have the legal tools to protect themselves and the Earth from ecological and climate degradation,” said Janice Harvey, Coordinator, Environment and Society Program.

“I have been following Silver Don Cameron’s work on this vital issue for several years now, and I am thrilled that students and faculty at STU will have the opportunity to hear from him first-hand about the work he is doing.  He has travelled the world to talk to some of the world’s most articulate, committed activists working in the field of environmental rights and he will bring this experience, knowledge and insight to his lecture.”

A distinguished educator, Cameron holds a BA from the University of British Columbia, an MA from the University of California, and a PhD. From the University of London, England. He is a member of both the Order of Canada and the Order of Nova Scotia.

Oct
3
Tue
George Marshall Lecture: Starting a new conversation about climate change with conservatives @ Tilley Hall auditorium, UNB
Oct 3 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

IS DONALD TRUMP GOOD FOR CLIMATE CHANGE?

George Marshall Lecture: Starting a new conversation about climate change with conservatives

Date: Oct. 3, 2017
Time: 7 pm
Place: Tilley Hall auditorium

George Marshall is an internationally respected author and researcher on climate change communications and Director of Projects at Climate Outreach. He will give a one-hour lecture at Tilley Hall auditorium, University of New Brunswick on October 3 at 7 p.m. The lecture will be followed by 30 minutes of questions and answers.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT: http://unb.ca/forestry

Oct
4
Wed
 The Case for Public Banking in NB @ Brian Mulroney Hall, Rm 101 at STU
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Keith Helmuth, author, editor and community development activist from Carleton County will be speaking on public banking as an alternative to the debt and deficit spending of our provincial government.  His talk, “The Case for Public Banking in NB and the End to External Debt Service Payments,” will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 4 at 7pm in Brian Mulroney Hall, Rm 101 on the St. Thomas campus.

Oct
12
Thu
Storying Activisms: Lecture by May Chazan, PhD @ Brian Mulroney Hall, Room 101
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Public Lecture – Storying Activisms: Intimate Geographies of Making, Un-making and Home-making in Nogojiwanong by May Chazan

DATE:   12/10/17
TIME:   7:00 PM
LOCATION:   Brian Mulroney Hall, Room 101

A scholar inspired by how social justice movements generate change and how, across differences in power, privilege and worldview, alliances are forged, will deliver a lecture on “storying activisms.”

The lecture, “Storying Activisms: Intimate Geographies of Making, Un-making and Home-making in Nogojiwanong,” by Canada Research Chair Dr. May Chazan, will take place on Thursday, Oct. 12 at 7 pm in Brian Mulroney Hall Room 101.

The lecture is sponsored by the Women Studies and Gender Studies Program, the Department of Sociology and the Department of Gerontology.

With interests in gender, aging and intergenerational alliances, Dr. Chazan’s current work focuses on struggles for social and environmental justice taking place on Turtle Island, where her position as a “white, settler, Canadian” underpins her commitment to critical, decolonizing and feminist scholarship.

“My talk will focus on my newest research on storying resistance, resurgence and resilience in Nogojiwanong (Peterborough, Ontario). I am examining activisms and activist connections through intergenerational, digital storytelling workshops, focusing on the mid-sized urban context of Nogojiwanong, the traditional territory of the Michi Saagiig Anishinaabeg,” said Chazan.

Chazan’s work aims to document the lesser told and frequently forgotten stories of activisms. She engages activists of different ages who identify as racialized, Indigenous and LGBTQ+.  She also seeks to contribute to queer, decolonial and feminist approaches to intergenerational storytelling as knowledge production methodology.

In her talk, Chazan will offer preliminary reflections on the emerging themes from the first round of research workshops.  Based on three storytellers’ interviews, she will explore how their stories reflect activisms as processes of both “un-making” (dismantling, resisting, exposing) oppressions and “making” (through creative work, land-based practices and ceremony) different, fairer, more sustainable futures. She will also discuss these storytellers’ invocations of “home” or “home-making” as central to their activisms, investigating the ways in which “home” is both highly emotive and highly contested in this context of ongoing settler colonialism.

Chazan is a Canada Research Chair in Gender and Feminist Studies and a faculty member in Gender and Women’s Studies at Trent University.  She also serves on the executive committee of the Trent Centre for Aging and Society.  She directs an activist-research collective called Aging Activisms (www.agingactivisms.org), which seeks to understand and support the many ways people of different ages, genders, backgrounds and abilities work for social change across different movements and across their lives.