Calendar

Nov
23
Thu
Democracy in the Platform Age – Digital Media and Global Affairs Expert Dr. Taylor Owen @ Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall – St. Thomas University
Nov 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

“Democracy in the Platform Age” – Digital Media and Global Affairs Expert Dr. Taylor Owen to Deliver Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism

DATE:   23/11/17
TIME:   7:00 PM
LOCATION:   Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall

Digital Media and Global Affairs expert Dr. Taylor Owen will deliver the Dalton Camp Lecture on Thursday, November 23 at 7 PM in the Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall.

Digital media and global affairs expert Dr. Taylor Owen will deliver the Dalton Camp Lecture on Thursday, November 23 at 7 pm in the Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall.

His lecture, “Democracy in the Platform Age” will explore how global digital platforms have transformed our civic discourse and increasingly shape our democracy.

Taylor Owen is Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Global Affairs at the University of British Columbia. He was previously the Research Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University where he led a program studying the impact of digital technology on the practice of journalism, and has held research positions at Yale University, The London School of Economics and The International Peace Research Institute, Oslo where his work focuses on the intersection between information technology, public policy and international affairs. His doctorate is from the University of Oxford and he has been a Trudeau and Banting Scholar, an Action Canada and Public Policy Forum Fellow, the 2016 Public Policy Forum Emerging Leader, and sits on the Board of Directors of the Center for International Governance Innovation.

He is the founder of the international affairs media platform OpenCanada.org, and is the author, most recently, of Disruptive Power: The Crisis of the State in the Digital Age (Oxford University Press, 2015) and the co-editor of The World Won’t Wait: Why Canada Needs to Rethink its Foreign Policies (University of Toronto Press, 2015, with Roland Paris), Journalism After Snowden: The Future of the Free Press in the Surveillance State (Columbia University Press, 2017, with Emily Bell) and The Platform Press: How Silicon Valley Re-enginnered Journalism (Tow Center 2017, with Emily Bell).

His work can be found at www.taylorowen.com and @taylor_owen.

The Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism is a partnership between St. Thomas University, CBC Radio and the Dalton Camp Endowment in Journalism. Past speakers have included Naomi Klein, Roy MacGregor, Chantal Hébert, Ken Whyte, Stephanie Nolen, Neil Reynolds, Nahlah Ayed, David Carr, Nelofer Pazira, Lyse Doucet, and Mohamed Fahmy.

Digital Media and Global Affairs with Dr. Taylor Owen @ Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall, St. Thomas University in Fredericton
Nov 23 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Digital Media and Global Affairs Expert Dr. Taylor Owen to Deliver Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism

DATE:   23/11/17
TIME:   7:00 PM
LOCATION:   Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall

Digital Media and Global Affairs expert Dr. Taylor Owen will deliver the Dalton Camp Lecture on Thursday, November 23 at 7 PM in the Kinsella Auditorium, McCain Hall.

Dr. Owen is Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia, a Senior Fellow at the Columbia Journalism School and the founder and publisher of OpenCanada.org. He was previously the Research Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University where he designed and led a program studying the impact of digital technology on the practice of journalism, and has held research positions at Yale University, The London School of Economics and The International Peace Research Institute, Oslo where his work focuses on the intersection between information technology and international affairs.

He is the author, most recently, of Disruptive Power: The Crisis of the State in the Digital Age (Oxford University Press, 2015) and the co-editor of The World Won’t Wait: Why Canada Needs to Rethink its Foreign Policies (University of Toronto Press, 2015, with Roland Paris), Journalism After Snowden: The Future of the Free Press in the Surveillance State (Columbia University Press, 2017, with Emily Bell) and The Platform Press: How Silicon Valley Re-enginnered Journalism (Tow Center 2017, with Emily Bell).

His work can be found at www.taylorowen.com and @taylor_owen.

The Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism is a partnership between St. Thomas University, CBC Radio and the Dalton Camp Endowment in Journalism. Past speakers have included Naomi Klein, Roy MacGregor, Chantal Hébert, Ken Whyte, Stephanie Nolen, Neil Reynolds, Nahlah Ayed, David Carr, Nelofer Pazira, Lyse Doucet, and Mohamed Fahmy.

Mobile Makers: Exploring Community Issues with Youth through Cellphilms @ Marshall d'Avray Hall, Room 261, UNB
Nov 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Faculty of Education Colloquium with Casey Burkholder

UNBF’s Faculty of Education Colloquium will feature Casey Burkholder discussing

Mobile Makers: Exploring Community Issues with Youth through Cellphilms – Cellphones plus Filmmaking

on Thursday, Nov. 23, from 7 – 8:30 p.m., in Marshall d’Avray Hall, 261.

Young people are already using their cellphones and mobile technologies to document their lives. Fears about cellphone-enabled youth deviancy, including sexting and cyber-bullying, have sparked moral panics in the media. Speaking back to these moral panics, I ask, how might young people’s everyday media-making practices be refocused to address issues that matter to them? How might these same youth media-making practices be brought into the classroom? What are some implications for teachers and schools? How might youth be included in research processes, including the ways in which the research is shared and archived? Providing examples from cellphilm (cellphone +filmmaking) workshops with young people in three community contexts (Hong Kong, Montreal and Charlottetown), this public lecture considers the opportunities and challenges to engaging cellphones as research tools.

Casey Burkholder is a faculty lecturer at the University of New Brunswick Fredericton, interested in critical teacher-education, and participatory visual research. She first became invested in the relationships between space, belonging, and civic engagement from a young age, growing up in the Northwest Territories. In choosing a research path at the intersection of citizenship, gender, inclusion, DIY media-making, and Social Studies education, Casey believes her work may contribute to ‘research as intervention’ (Mitchell, 2011) through participatory approaches to equity and social change.

This is a free public event.

Live Streamed at http://www.youtube.com/user/UNBFEduc

Nov
24
Fri
When Friendships End: The Cultural Contradictions of a Modern Personal Relationship @ Brian Mulroney Hall, Room 103, STU
Nov 24 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Public Talk by Dr. Peter Mallory – “When Friendships End: The Cultural Contradictions of a Modern Personal Relationship”

DATE:   24/11/17
TIME:   2:30 PM
LOCATION:   Brian Mulroney Hall, Room 103

Dr. Peter Mallory, professor of Sociology at St. Francis Xavier University and a graduate of the Sociology program at St. Thomas University, will discuss the dark side of friendship and the contradictions that result from it in his talk “When friendships end: The cultural contradictions of a modern personal relationship,” on Friday, November 24 at 2:30 pm in Brian Mulroney Hall Room 103.

In his talk, Mallory will discuss a paper—co-authored with Laura Eramian of Dalhousie University—that examines the dark side of friendship, a relationship that is often idealized in both scholarly literature and popular culture.

Drawing from interviews with residents of Halifax, Mallory suggests friendship is a relationship riddled with contradictions people experience as practical tensions in the very relationships thought to provide support and a sense of belonging. It’s these contradictions that he believes make friendship a germane site for understanding transformations in modern intimacy.?

Mallory holds a BA (Sociology) from St. Thomas University and MA and PhD from York University. His scholarly interests are in the areas of social and political theory, friendship studies, interpersonal relationships, and political sociology.

The talk is co-sponsored by the Department of Sociology and the Canada Research Chair in Global and International Studies.